from Plastic Life by Vincent Bousserez

I follow lot's of highly creative blogs, and my favorites are linked on the right hand column of this page under Mandatory Reading, but the one that I rush to every day is John Foster's Accidental Mysteries. This online arts magazine is, as described by Foster...

"A BLOG ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY, DESIGN, ART, ARCHITECTURE, EPHEMERA, FOUND OBJECTS, POP CULTURE, ANONYMOUS, OUTSIDER ART, FOLK ART, SELF-TAUGHT ART, ILLUSTRATION, BEAUTY, ESOTERICA, AUCTIONS, DISCOVERY, ART ENVIRONMENTS, MYSTERY, VINTAGE STUFF AND THE MAGIC THAT CAN BE FOUND IN EVERYDAY THINGS"

...and that pretty much describes it, it's about everything and anything that Foster finds interesting, and John Foster has a magic touch for finding things of interest.


Today's post about photographer Vincent Bousserez's amazing macro work with little plastic people includes this wonderful commentary about growing up "Artistic".

When I was kid in grade school, I would often be singled out for day dreaming, when all I was doing was thinking about, say, the pencil trough on my desk as... a long trench for an imaginary army. “Wha-a-a-at? Oh-h yes, Miss Ammons, oh... I’m sorry, read the next paragraph? O.K. Let’s seee-e?” I was clueless, and busted. It happened all the time. Am I going to blame it on ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder)? Nope. I blame it on the fact that I was born, like many others, with a different way of seeing the world.

Doctor: “Mrs. Foster, we’ve completed the tests on your son. Why don’t you have a seat.”

Mom: “Well-ll, is he O.K? Why the look? Wha-a-at?”

Doctor: “I’m so sorry, Mrs. Foster. Johnny was born............ artistic.”

Mom: “Oh-h my Gawrd! Can he be cured?”

Doctor: “Well, Mrs. Foster— though rare, a few of these children often grow out of this affliction and lead successful but frustrated lives. We think the best course of action is simply to leave Johnny in the public school system. There, some of these kids like your son—we call them “artistic children”— will learn to conform, to understand math, and eventually perhaps— find a job in industry, or sales. Now, I have to be honest and tell you that some never do come out of this. Our research has shown that a large percentage of these children actually enjoy being artistic—they enjoy being different! I know, I know, don’t cry... there, there Mrs. Foster. We could try electric shock!”



accidental mysteries by John Foster

plastic life by Vincent Bousserez
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